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#11 Chelsea

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 12:25 PM

one thing to consider for nationals - - those darn big hotel bills. if clients are coming and going, depending on their show schedules, maybe get a double room and split the costs. sometimes the hotels give a better rate if you are staying for two weeks rather than a few days..
I am seriously thinking that after this next show, I have to sit down with my trainer and make a real plan. I just do not see taking three horses to Tulsa .......that's like 18k. Two of them stand a chance to be able to win some prize money to help with those costs............but hauling a yearling (HA gelding at that) and sepnding so much sounds just a little nuts to the serious side of my brain. I remember this is about an 18 hour trip for my ponies so each is sure to run up a $1500 hauling bill; plus those big trainer fees and entries (and of course two require futurity/maturity fees)


We try to split hotel rooms with other clients and pretty much every show we do. Every little bit helps, you know? If we're flying to a show, we'll split a rental car, too.

I work from home and keep my own hours, so I'm lucky in that regard for now. When I was in college, things were trickier, but since I was a good student I always worked it out with my professors. I'm with Becky in that I need to plan out who of mine are for sure going to Nationals this year. I have one for Canada (futurity filly) and one for US (HA hunter pleasure maturity horse IF she's ready...), and it might be best if it stays at that. I just keep thinking "Boy, I'd like to have something to ride in Canada!" Heck, we just settled our Regional entries last weekend. And those are a month away. I tend to let things go until I HAVE to decide just so I know exactly where my horses are, my schedule, etc. I've given up on planning months in advance because it just doesn't seem to work very well most of the time, lol. I take it one show at a time now. The only difference is for the horses that are aiming for age limited classes.

Chelsea

2013 Canadian National Champion, 2013 US National Top Ten, 2012 Canadian National Top Ten, 2011 Canadian National Champion in Halter, 2013 NSH Finals Champion Hunter Pl. Jr. Horse A Major Hottie AA+

2013 Canadian National Top Ten AAOTR & AATR, 2012 Canadian National Top Ten AAOTR, 2010 US National Top Ten AAOTR WOA Matador+/

2013 Regional Champion PA Layla


#12 KMCnYellow

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 01:19 PM

With this year already off and running and you having all this good upheaval in your life, you might think about this; go ahead and take a pass on this year. If you can, bring him home and take this year to ride him and get to know what makes him tick. From what I have read of him, he is an exceptional horse. You could use this time constructively to get to know him thoroughly - which will definitely give you an advantage in the show ring. I'd then send him back to your Trainer at the first of the year and go full tilt towards all your goals. By then, you will have saved some vacation time, you can coordinate your schedule better and not miss the things you need to attend, and you will have taken the time to bond with him - and there will be no stopping you. Sometimes life can hand you a little setback in one area, but if you use that time wisely, you might just see your plan come together even better than expected.

#13 sport horses

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 04:31 PM

In addition to all the other great suggestions have you spoken to your employer about non paid vacation time? When I hired on a new business and had a prior commitment I told them at the interview that I could start right away - but I had a prior commitment and gave them the time frame. It never stopped me from being hired. Since you are already employed it might be easier - and it would alleviate any stress and help with your decisions. If they say "no', all your questions are answered. If they say "yes", then you can figure a way to make it happen. Good luck and congratulations on having 'the' horse to take you there.
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll smell forever... but be out from underfoot.

#14 Lmequine

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:54 PM

With this year already off and running and you having all this good upheaval in your life, you might think about this; go ahead and take a pass on this year. If you can, bring him home and take this year to ride him and get to know what makes him tick. From what I have read of him, he is an exceptional horse. You could use this time constructively to get to know him thoroughly - which will definitely give you an advantage in the show ring. I'd then send him back to your Trainer at the first of the year and go full tilt towards all your goals. By then, you will have saved some vacation time, you can coordinate your schedule better and not miss the things you need to attend, and you will have taken the time to bond with him - and there will be no stopping you. Sometimes life can hand you a little setback in one area, but if you use that time wisely, you might just see your plan come together even better than expected.


I think this is a good idea. You would get to know your dream horse and enjoy him. Maybe go a an open schooling type show when you have time. Don't let owning your dream horse became stressful. He can take a year off and still be an awesome horse next show season.
Leah Johnson
Quitman, TX

#15 ponygirl

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:14 PM

Focus on the new job for right now that is most important. You will have time coming to you in the future. once your new employer is more confident with your job skills and abilities you may be surprise at them letting you have a little extra time off. dont forget you will also have vacation time coming. Don't worry about others showing your horse, he is building points and experience right now that is a very positive thing that will work for you later. Having the horse of your dreams is a giant step so don't feel you have to rush into things right now. Focus in the most important areas which is your job with time everything else will fall into place.
Sherry Cichocki
SLC Camelot Farms

#16 secondchanceranch

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:39 PM

When I started my job a few years ago I told them point blank the only reason I was getting a job was to pay to show horses so if I couldn't have time off to do that working was pointless! I live in a small town and the owners are friends so it's worked out well. I work anytime they need me as long as it isn't during a show and doesn't interfere with horses. I give them the show schedule early in the year so they know what to expect. 2 years ago they also hired my dtr part-time as well because she needed a 2nd job to help pay for her horses. Now they have to deal with BOTH of us wanting time off at the SAME time! It often interferes with art shows (my boss is a potter), but they always give me the time I need off. I'm very lucky in that regard. My biggest problem is in knowing we can only afford to show 1-2 horses a year and deciding who to show! (we own 24). It seems silly to spend over $20k a year to show one horse at 3-4 shows! Non-horse people think we're nuts (and rightly so)!!!
Dawn Brown
Baida Arabians
Glenside, Saskatchewan, Canada
306-867-2128
dawn.scr@hotmail.com
www.baidaarabians.com

#17 WanderingStar

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 06:35 AM

It would break my heart to put all that $$$ into training for a year for ONE Class A show. You already know Nationals and regionals are off the table... Bring your horse home gosh darn it!

Pros:
- Less stress on him and his body. He'll get a mental and physical break from the rigors of being a trained athlete every day
- Lowered cost of care on the horse. Not just in training fees, but farrier bills and possibly vet bills as well
- More fun for you to get to ENJOY your dream horse every day
- Getting to ride him at home regularly will make you a better team

Cons:
- Loss of training and conditioning on the horse
- Don't have the trainer expertise to help with riding, shoeing, and just in general caring for the horse

I can also say I've never regretted bringing a horse home for a break.
The Daughter of Reason

#18 WanderingStar

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 06:51 AM

Also, as far as how I do it... Spending the money on a trainer is painful. Painful. PAINFUL. I wouldn't be going to regionals or nationals if I didn't have an awesome mommy who just can't stand to watch her daughter's horse looking fantastic and not capitalizing on the opportunity to go. So as long as she gets to show, I have some financial support there. I'm cutting corners everywhere else in my budget to keep the horse in training in the meantime. Lots of projects to take care of around my house (new lawn, fix sprinkler system, new carpet) that are sitting on the back burner until next year. And in the meantime, hope I don't get relocated across the country (with my job, I could be leaving at the drop of a hat).

Luckily, my boss is pretty understanding about the vacation time for shows. I spent the first two years on the job accruing hours, so now taking a week for nationals and two half-weeks for regionals is pretty easy. I was able to go to just one Class A show to get qualified because my horse was already qualified from last year when I showed on my own. I grew up with my trainer's wife, and so they help me out by working with me too. I groom for them whenever I can to help with my bill. Between regionals and nationals he'll be dropped off of the training list to keep my costs down, but they'll have the peace of mind knowing he'll stay in good shape before nationals. And after nationals, he's coming home indefinitely. No big plans to show next year. I'll probably pop in to some of the local Class A shows on my own, but this is my last big year for a while. I need to be saving money for a new truck and taking care of my house. And I know how much fun I'll have with my boy back home too :)
The Daughter of Reason

#19 secondchanceranch

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 06:54 AM

The only problem with bringing the horse home is that most trainers won't hold your spot and the good trainers only take on so many horses. There's usually a waiting list of people wanting to get their horse in and as soon as you pull out your spot is filled so you would have to wait until next season to show. That is a very personal choice to make and one I would discuss with your trainer. The trainer can still take the horse to shows and show it ... it just won't be you riding :(

The plus side of not showing this season is it gives you a chance to put extra training on the horse if you choose to leave him there. You could also bring him home now and send him back after US Nationals to train over winter and be ready to show next year. This gives you lots of time to save money and develop a rapport with your boss so you won't feel bad asking for time off to show your horse!

Ultimately, it's your decision to make and it's a tough one.
Dawn Brown
Baida Arabians
Glenside, Saskatchewan, Canada
306-867-2128
dawn.scr@hotmail.com
www.baidaarabians.com

#20 murphy

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 07:04 AM

Have you checked out the schedule yet? Usually the select rider classes are in the first few days of the show. Maybe you would only have to take off a couple days?