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Dr. Don Henneke issues a new Statement


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#61 setter555

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 05:08 AM

http://www.thehorse....e.aspx?ID=17559


What was the publication date of the article at horse.com?

#62 Briska

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 05:55 AM

January 18, 2011
Be careful of the words you say, and keep them soft and sweet. For you never know, from time to time, which ones you'll have to eat.

Foals arriving in 2012 are also for sale
**Pentika V x Gotcha in April **RO Siena Sunshine x Gotcha in April **Falicity x Gotcha in May **RNT Pyrrunata x FSF Vintage Flyer in May

#63 setter555

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 07:52 AM

January 18, 2011


This date is sobering as it is coincidental to other concurrent activities that were going on elsewhere.

#64 Briska

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

Here's a link to the Equine Sanctuary and Rescue Facility Guideline, which was published by UC Davis in August of 2009. It is a very good, sound paper citing best management practices utilized throughout the horse industry. It is designed to support the rescue and sanctuary operator.

The most marked difference between this Guideline and the "Care" document published in November 2010, is the third author.

Dr. Madigan is the third author of the Guideline paper. He is a UC Davis professor and is as credentialed and respected in his field as Dr. Henneke is in his.

Dr. Miller, the principle author of the CEHMSOC, is a private practice vet who's claim to fame is his involvement in aiding AC, Humane Societies and law enforcement, conduct animal seizures. I've yet to get an answer as to why a private practice vet is allowed (paid?) to publish under the auspices of the University. To add fuel to this fire, I have wondered if he went to vet school on an HSUS scholarship...he graduated in 2004 and by 2006 was heavily involved in seizures. Very interesting.

To be published by a respected University is highly desirable, as it enhances your prestige..so, it is not inconsequential to have your name first as this indicates you are the principle author. When viewed in light of Dr. Miller's zeal in his interpretation of the California Penal code, it is truly disturbing that he was given such a position.




http://www.vetmed.uc...eGUIDE.0909.pdf
Be careful of the words you say, and keep them soft and sweet. For you never know, from time to time, which ones you'll have to eat.

Foals arriving in 2012 are also for sale
**Pentika V x Gotcha in April **RO Siena Sunshine x Gotcha in April **Falicity x Gotcha in May **RNT Pyrrunata x FSF Vintage Flyer in May

#65 miriggs

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:31 AM

thanks briska. read it late last night & was going to post tonight


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DW Paradas Gem & Sammy too

Together forever & forever in my heart.

Mi Reagal Dream, RVA Dream Deelite and TLF Adamas


#66 UFOH1

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 05:06 PM

Most vets have their diplomas displayed on their wall. Anything unusual there? Is there any way to ask Dr. Madigan to explain how this happened?

#67 miriggs

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 07:03 PM

http://www.thehorse....19767&src=topic
Kentucky Equine Health and Welfare Council Convenes

by: Erica Larson, News Editor
March 21 2012, Article # 19767

The voluntary certification of equine rescue, retirement, and rehabilitation facilities was a major focus during the Kentucky Equine Health and Welfare Council’s meeting in Frankfort on March 20. Other matters of discussion included a statistical summary of equine welfare complaints received by the Kentucky State Veterinarian’s Office in 2011.

Council chairman Rusty Ford welcomed 11 additional council members as well as Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James R. Comer to discuss the progress made on goals the council set the last time it met; the primary goal, Ford said, was to develop a certification examination template for use to evaluate Kentucky horse rescues and adoption facilities on a voluntary basis.

“The objectives in developing this voluntary certification program are to give donors of resources a comfort level that funds or equipment will be used well, and to give horse owners a level of comfort that the donated horse will be given an acceptable level of care,” Ford explained.

Bob Coleman, PhD, council member and a professor at the University of Kentucky, presented a grading scale he developed to the council.

"We wanted to start with this being an unintimidating process to facilitate it being used,” Coleman said, also noting that it’s not yet been defined what entity or just who will perform the certification inspections. In developing the template “We looked at a lot of things, with the end result being for a facility to receive certification status, the facility must meet a standard of ability to provide the defined care that includes shelter, nutrition, health care and other basic husbandry practices."

Coleman explained that the certification form is based on a 1- to 3-point grading system, with points awarded in a variety of horse health care and management-related categories. “What constitutes a 1 or a 3 in each of these categories will need to be defined,” he said. "That will probably be a next step if this is on the right track."

The council discussed a number of potential factors that would influence how a rescue is scored. For example, State Veterinarian Robert Stout, DVM, noted that different facilities have different missions (for example, rescue facilities that take all horses, regardless of the maintenance the animals require; retirement facilities that provide homes for older performance horses; or maintenance facilities that simply turn easy keepers out onto grass pastures and provide them with adequate food, shelter, and water), which an inspector should consider when evaluating the properties.

The group reached a consensus that because findings are rather subjective it might be beneficial--and would better ensure consistency--to have more than one individual conduct the facility inspection during the certification process. Many also agreed that at least one inspection should include a licensed veterinarian to evaluate the ability of the potential caregivers.

Several council members expressed that once the group develops and approves a final form inspectors will need to undergo standardized training to ensure all facilities are evaluated on a relatively equal scale. To that end, Stout noted that an equine minimum standards code is currently in the works in Kentucky and should be ready for use by late summer.

Next the council will work on defining what constitutes a "pass" or a "fail," understanding that the certification presents an educational opportunity for rescue facilities. The council agreed that, should a facility receive a low score in some areas, they would have the chance to make changes before undergoing reevaluation by the state.

Ford noted that he hopes the voluntary rescue or adoption facility certification program will be complete and ready for use by late fall.

In other business, council member Alex Barnett provided a summary of a roundtable discussion conducted during the winter meeting of the Kentucky County Judge Executives Association, in which he and Rusty Ford participated. Six 30-minute sessions were conducted, and each session was well-attended by county government officials. Ford reported that numerous officials expressed gratitude to the Kentucky Equine Health and Welfare Council for developing minimal standards of care criteria. Animal control and other local regulators use the standards when investigating allegations of equine abuse and neglect.

Along the line of welfare complaints for Kentucky in 2011, Ford reported that, "69 calls were received, with 68% of the calls alleging neglect, 19% reporting improper disposal of carcasses, 12% alleged abuse and 1% of the calls reported apparent abandonment of equine."

DW Paradas Gem & Sammy too

Together forever & forever in my heart.

Mi Reagal Dream, RVA Dream Deelite and TLF Adamas


#68 miriggs

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 08:26 PM

It’s that festive time of year again—trees and lights and presents and carols and turkey . . . and the Animal Legal Defense Fund’s annual ranking of state animal protection laws. Things were unchanged at both the top and bottom of the list. The news was an early Christmas present for Illinois (ranked as the state with the best and most comprehensive animal protection laws for four consecutive years) and another embarrassing stocking crammed with coal for Kentucky (the self-proclaimed "Horse Capital of the World" finished dead last for the fifth straight year).
The ALDF staff worked through more than 4,000 pages of state statutes and then assigned a numerical ranking to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and a few other outlying jurisdictions. The rankings are based on 14 different categories, including general prohibitions, penalties and exemptions, requirements (or lack thereof) for mental health evaluations and counseling, cost recovery, forfeiture of seized animals, veterinarian reporting of suspected abuse, law enforcement policies, animal fighting, and registration for convicted offenders.
The top five states in the 2011 ranking are:
1. Illinois
2. Maine
3. Michigan
4. Oregon
5. California
The worst five states are:
46. South Dakota
47. Iowa
48. Idaho
49. North Dakota
50. Kentucky
(To be fair, and to give Kentucky its due, the Bluegrass State did manage to edge out the Northern Mariana Islands and American Samoa in the ALDF rankings.)
The best states have animal protection statutes with much in common:
● A wide range of felony penalties
Adequate standards for basic care
● Escalating penalties for repeat offenders
● Protection for most species
● Required or optional court-ordered counseling
● Mandatory reporting of suspected abuse by veterinarians
● Recovery of costs by animal welfare organizations
● Inclusion of animals in domestic protection orders
No state’s laws are perfect, but the standards set by the top five are a good roadmap for state legislators.
The worst states, not surprisingly, fall short in nearly all of these categories. Felony penalty options are limited, standards of care may be lacking, court-ordered counseling for offenders seldom is an option, recovery of costs by animal welfare organizations is limited, restrictions on post-conviction ownership are difficult, and veterinarian reporting of suspected abuse is not mandatory. Kentucky law, amazingly, is the only state that actually prohibits veterinarian reporting of suspected abuse without written consent by the animal owner or a court order.
There is a roadmap here, too, but not a good one. Instead, these states show the paths to avoid for state legislators interested in animal welfare.
Download the full ALDF report (www.aldf.org/article.php?id=1894) and see where your state ranks—top tier, middle tier, or bottom tier.
Are you satisfied with your state’s laws?
http://cs.thehorse.c...The-States.aspx

DW Paradas Gem & Sammy too

Together forever & forever in my heart.

Mi Reagal Dream, RVA Dream Deelite and TLF Adamas