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Training my stallion for dressage


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#11 bettyk

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 06:11 AM

Farriers Formula is more for hoof health although it does have some good things in it. You should probably look more toward the hyaluronic acid products for hock problems. One of my horses has arthritis in his hocks and is given a monthly HA injection. I also have him on a product called Joint Matrix which is formulated by the Baronne Veterinary Clinic in Louisiana--it has a higher concentration of beneficial ingredients than, say, Smart Flex from SmartPak. (You can google them--Joint Matrix is about $150, including shipping, and lasts about three months.)

I'm a little curious about your statement: "So I am hoping once he hits the show ring he brings me some money back." It's been my experience that showing is not all that financially rewarding, dressage or otherwise:)!

BettyK

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Arabest Kaliel (Arabest Kalid x Arabest Denabiela)
Ravenwood Qahtahn (Qahtahn x Ravenwood Gemmone)
El Ghorab Sneferu (GAF Mosaad x Stonehedge Fateza) - Sadly lost 6/6/10
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#12 Rye

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 07:05 AM

Generally dressage horses don't get $ as prizes (at least in USDF shows)...and the costs of preparing/showing are never recovered....

I think you may be in for a hard time with no trainer, however, I can suggest reading Jane Savioe and Betsy Steiner. Both present dressage in a simple/easy to understand way.

Otherwise, as i said in my above post, spend a good 6 months conditioning the horses. Don't expect contact too soon, ride the horse FORWARD and stay off the face/back. As the horse gets more muscle you can use figures to supple the horse, getting connection to the outside rein, and then the horse should gradually come on the bit as the hocks engage. Otherwise look at the new tests for directions where a horse should be for each level.

And work on your positon-You need to be balanced with elastic elbows so the horse can come through the back.

Arabs are tough buggers to ride in dressage and often set the head instead of going correctly on the bit -it can be VERY hard to tell the difference. they are smart and come up with a lot of evasions-too fast, too slow, crooked....Canter is often the hardest gait for arabs in dressage and they need extra time to figure out how to canter correctly.

For a horse that had a hock injury I would start on legend iv or adequan. I never had good luck with the oral supps besides Conquer gel and Next Level. I wouldn't wait till I saw a problem before starting the horse on something. Also, not taking contact or going foward can show lameness, its not always "visible" as a shorter step.

#13 summerhunny11

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 07:33 AM

For a horse that had a hock injury I would start on legend iv or adequan. I never had good luck with the oral supps besides Conquer gel and Next Level. I wouldn't wait till I saw a problem before starting the horse on something. Also, not taking contact or going foward can show lameness, its not always "visible" as a shorter step.



Agreed, do as much as you can afford with the IM and IV drugs. I have had amazing results at keeping my teen horse sound on Adequan. I recently found that Heartland Vet supply offers a 10 dose vial for only $384.95!!!!
That's REALLY a great deal considering I used to pay $300 for the 7 pack. I dont know about anyone else but my horse does well on about 5 injections for the year. You wont regret it that's for sure, and you will keep your horse sound and comfortable.

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Gwalabu (Gwalior x Bint Kyrwa) X WN Baleza (GG Samir x GA Annie)

 


#14 fireweedak

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 12:13 PM

..I would like to know the best methods of starting a very green mare, and slowly start a green injuried stallion. I have done round pen work with both, ground long reining, and riding on the mare. Where can I find more information on dressage training?

....



There's so much to learn in dressage philosophy and principles. However, a minor detail, and my first tidbit, dressage horses do not have a head set. They are to reach into contact and accept contact.

For dressage theory & principles, these will get you started
I really like this blog: http://www.classicaldressage.co.uk/
I also heard this is a very good book Dressage Masters: Techniques and Philosophies of Four Legendary Trainers
as well as this one Complete Training of Horse and Rider
USDF also has e-Track, elearning videos. Membership required to view. I have not seen them, but they look very informative.
Another USDF link

USEF Dressage info

As far as riding your greenies: get miles on them. They need to develop muscle to carry themselves correctly in dressage. Get them moving relaxed and rhythmically, ride them forward, stretched and straight, and expose them to different things until you can connect with an instructor.
I'd also recommend auditing clinics, lessons, schooling shows.

#15 KnightsRose

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 01:34 PM

I was in 4H for many years and had a dressage trainer at one point but she only ever made me ride HER horses not mine and she REFUSED to train arabians :( so I left her. I have ridden in intro level and training level dressage shows and won classes with my older already trained mare. I just have never trained a horse to do it. I know they need alot of muscling and flexing, my friend who was helping with my new mare was doing some shoulder in and shoulder out with the mare for a short bit, we did alot of ground work and long reining and she was showing promise.

I had a friend who did knee injections in her mare and over long term it caused more problems and the mare is now lame. I had him on Next Level liquid for over two years and my vet said it was a good one. I am looking at Farrier's Formula for my older mare who has the worset feet I have ever seen on an arab but I wanted to know if it was any good.

I have been reading in a few of my arab magazines that they have a program for horses and riders that show open and or arab shows could win monies. I also want to show him as much as possible and see if in a few years or so he could do some breedings. I know right now nothing is selling and horses arent breeding right now thats why I am looking LONG term.
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#16 lkirby

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 02:09 PM

My father used The Missing Link Equine Plus Formula supplement for his arthritic Arabian mare with great success.

I would recommend that you read Alois Podhajsky's "Complete Training of Horse and Rider", which is the best book about classical dressage. Alois Podhajsky was the head of the famed Spanish Riding School in Vienna and trained many riders and Lipizzan stallions.

I was trained in classical dressage and it took my own trainer two (2) years of carefully concentrated work from the point of starting the horse before they could be taken to any show. I would recommend that you contact your old dressage trainer and see if you can still be trained long distance by the use of videos. Another suggestion is to look for a local dressage club as their members would be a great resource of information.

I would also recommend that you continue to train your horses using long lines as a great deal of necessary work can be done before they have to carry the weight of a rider. There is a vast difference in the amount of pressure placed on the hocks of a horse galloping in a field compared with carrying a rider in a small arena. First the horse has to be trained to carry their own body in a natural frame before they can be asked to carry a rider.

I would also seriously suggest that you start working on your eight (8) year old mare and stop riding your young stallion as he is still growing in his body and his joints have not yet matured. Too many people have been spoiled by "futurities" that reward early riding of young horses, but those same horses may have a very short performance career because their joints have been damaged and it is irreversible. Most people who are serious about dressage won't start riding their horses until they are at least six (6) years old.

Lorna G. Kirby, PE
When you have gone through fire, you won't fade in the sun!!

#17 KnightsRose

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 06:04 PM

My father used The Missing Link Equine Plus Formula supplement for his arthritic Arabian mare with great success.

I would recommend that you read Alois Podhajsky's "Complete Training of Horse and Rider", which is the best book about classical dressage. Alois Podhajsky was the head of the famed Spanish Riding School in Vienna and trained many riders and Lipizzan stallions.

I was trained in classical dressage and it took my own trainer two (2) years of carefully concentrated work from the point of starting the horse before they could be taken to any show. I would recommend that you contact your old dressage trainer and see if you can still be trained long distance by the use of videos. Another suggestion is to look for a local dressage club as their members would be a great resource of information.

I would also recommend that you continue to train your horses using long lines as a great deal of necessary work can be done before they have to carry the weight of a rider. There is a vast difference in the amount of pressure placed on the hocks of a horse galloping in a field compared with carrying a rider in a small arena. First the horse has to be trained to carry their own body in a natural frame before they can be asked to carry a rider.

I would also seriously suggest that you start working on your eight (8) year old mare and stop riding your young stallion as he is still growing in his body and his joints have not yet matured. Too many people have been spoiled by "futurities" that reward early riding of young horses, but those same horses may have a very short performance career because their joints have been damaged and it is irreversible. Most people who are serious about dressage won't start riding their horses until they are at least six (6) years old.

Lorna G. Kirby, PE


Lorna,
I will look into that supplement thank you :)

I was going to contact the other trainer Jessica Wisdom and see if I can work with her for lessons even if they are on her horses. My old trainer hasnt gone past 4 level and she wont help you unless you pay for them. My stallion hasnt had as much long reining work as the mare has. I have long reined him out on trails on his own though and he was great. I have read a bit about the classical dressage training and liked what I have seen.

I havent done much riding with him besides getting on moving around in the saddle made him walk alittle and then got off. He LOVES the bit he will put it in his own mouth :P lol but his mouth is a bit hard. The mare has a soft supple mouth and neck dont need hardly any pressure with her at all. I am going to start long reining her some more and get her back end under her more, cause if you look at my pics of her she really has no back end. ( Those pics are old and she looks WAY better now) But still she has no back end right now. Gvv Behy Renegade is her name can see her pedigree on allbreedpedigree.com.

I was thinking too of just starting him lightly under saddle cause he is getting bored out in his field and all his ground work is done. I dont show in the futurities nor have anyone that is in them. I am small starting all on my own, but the small dressage shows I have gone to I love the riding style the beauty the grace and watching a few trainers on youtube just fell in love with it all.

Also this spring my stallion is doing two breedings, one for a friend and one for his mom :P two purebred arabs.
Breeding perfection with beauty, brains, and agilty like you've never seen before, an ARABIAN
Knights Rose Equestrian Park
Roy, WA