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Someone Talk Me Down


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#1 kathy s.

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 09:12 AM

My mare is 4 months in foal to MMV and this morning I noticed she is bagging up. She has been on 10cc of regumate daily because we were unable to get her settled in prior attempts-this is her first pregnancy. I called my vet and he said to bring her in tomorrow and plans to run a hormone panel on her. He said do not discontinue the regumate, so I did some research this morning and learned that a sudden drop in progesterone can  trigger the foaling process.

  Has anyone been through this? I am sick about it and worried she may slip the foal. Thanks for any help/advice. 


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#2 OHR

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:09 AM

Listen to your vet and keep breathing. Its not all that unusual.


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#3 kathy s.

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 01:11 PM

Listen to your vet and keep breathing. Its not all that unusual.

 

 

  Thank you, OHR. Have you had this happen too? What happened and what was the outcome?

 

     I couldn't stand it, so I hauled her in this afternoon. He drew blood and we should know something by the end of the week. He did an ultrasound and said the placenta thickness is normal, there is no vaginal discharge, and no temp. Needless to say, I left the mare there until we find out what is going on. The vet didn't seem too concerned, but of course we'll find out if there is an infection or something else.

 

      Good God, I'm going to be  a total fruitloop by the time she is due next March. 


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#4 OHR

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 02:43 PM

What happened was ....nothing. Many mares get a hormone swing about that time. Some act like they are in season, some produce a bag, or any of several other things you might consider "not normal". In a few days or as much as a couple weeks, its back to the business of growing a foal, with no harm done. If she isn't streaming milk or going into labor, you probably have nothing to worry about.


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#5 kathy s.

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 03:13 PM

What happened was ....nothing. Many mares get a hormone swing about that time. Some act like they are in season, some produce a bag, or any of several other things you might consider "not normal". In a few days or as much as a couple weeks, its back to the business of growing a foal, with no harm done. If she isn't streaming milk or going into labor, you probably have nothing to worry about.

 

 

     Thanks for the reassurance! The vet called and said he ran a serum something (?) test after I left and there is no indication of an infection. This is only the second maiden mare I've had and I guess I'm freaking out a bit b/c we finally got her settled after trying for 2 years. 

   Thanks again for talking me down. I can't tell you how much it's appreciated.  


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Kathy
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#6 OHR

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 04:11 PM

No problem. Just keep breathing and it will be fine.


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#7 kathy s.

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:32 PM

No problem. Just keep breathing and it will be fine.

 

 

   Your advice for me to breathe made me lol. By the time I got home, I was feeling sick, literally. I realized I hadn't eaten since last night and had to eat an ice cream bar just to settle my stomach enough to eat a salad.   Backwards, but it worked.


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#8 OHR

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:45 PM

Better now, I hope. And dessert first is always good. That way you know you have room for it!


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#9 kathy s.

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 07:48 PM

Better now, I hope. And dessert first is always good. That way you know you have room for it!

 

Lol, true!


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#10 Dreamcatcher

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 02:48 AM

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Better now, I hope. And dessert first is always good. That way you know you have room for it!

Ditto what OHR said.  Life is short so eat desert first! 

 

How old is this mare?  I know you probably posted in another thread but I've forgotten.  I've had several mares who 'bag up' about this time, but it's usually just a transient swelling and not really bagging up.  They usually go on to have normal, timely (as in 11 month gestation) foals.  Of course, since she's maiden she'll be maddening and either go a little early or late because it just won't do to be predictable. 

 

  FOALING MARE'S SECRET CODE  

The mare's secret code of honor is as old as horses themselves and is ultimately the species best kept secret. No mare shall ever produce a foal before it's time.(It's time being determined by the following factors):

No foal shall be born until total chaos has been reached by all involved. Your house must be a wreck, your family hungry and desperate for clean clothes, and your social life nonexistent.

Midwives must reach the babbling fool status before you foal out. Bloodshot eyes, tangled hair and the inability to form a sentence mean you're getting close.

For every bell, beeper, camera or whistle they attach to you, foaling must be delayed by at least one day for each item.

Vet check, add a day, internal add three. If you hear the words, "She's nowhere near ready. You'll be fine while I'm away for the weekend," Wait 12 to 16 hours and pop that baby out!

Owner stress must be at an all time high! If you are in the care of someone else, ten to fifteen phone calls a day is a sign you're getting close. When you hear the words "I can't take it anymore!" wait three days and produce a foal.

You must keep this waiting game interesting. False alarms are necessary! Little teasers such as looking at your stomach, pushing your food around in the bucket and then walking away from it are always good for a rise. Be creative and find new things to do to keep the adrenaline pumping in those who wait.

The honor of all horses is now in your hands. Use this time to avenge all of your stable mates. Think about your friend who had to wear that silly costume in front of those people. Hang onto that baby for another day. OH, they made him do tricks too! Three more days seems fair. Late feedings, the dreaded diet, bad haircuts, those awful wormings can also be avenged at this time.

If you have fulfilled all of the above and are still not sure when to have this foal, listen to the weather forecast on the radio that has been so generously provided by those who wait. Severe storm warning is what you're waiting for. In the heart of the storm jump into action! The power could go out and you could have the last laugh. You have a good chance of those who wait missing the whole thing while searching for a flashlight that works!

Make the most of your interrupted nights. Beg for food each time someone comes into the stable to Check you. Your stable mates will love you as the extra goodies fall their way too. Remember, this code of honor was designed to remind man of how truly special horses are. Do your best to reward those who wait with a beautiful filly to carry on the mare code of honor for the next generation of those who wait!

 

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