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LEG CONFORMATION LESSON


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#11 Arlene Magid

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:37 AM

I'm kinda like you Arlene, in that I would love to see more education about breeding genetics. Its so important for the long run of our breed! And lets face it, alot of people havent had the opportunity to see tons and tons of horses and go with what has been marketed most effectivly.
Thank God many people do critique their own and do a good job at studying the breed. I wish their was a book that was unbiased but honest about the pros and cons of the most used and underused bloodlines of our breed. The more education, the better.

Laurie


Laurie, I wish more people did do their own critiques...I don't think as many do as should.
I've ruminated about writing a book on this topic but it would be a lot of work and with the smaller number of people breeding these days I am not sure how well it would sell.
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#12 Tamcam

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:39 AM

What came first, the coon foot or the straight or long pasterns? Also, post legged horses can eventually become coon footed. They break down behind with over work. My point is that conformational faults usually exsist that help cause coon footed.


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#13 msjwebb

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:42 AM

You can think of coonfooted as the opposite of having an upright pastern. The patern can be almost parallel to the ground in some cases.

Gotcha. So this is bad for every discipline other than the I think it is the "park horses"? The ones that try to imitate the "big lick saddlebred horses"? Almost every picture I have seen with the funky shoeing and pads the pastern looks like this. Maybe I am wrong and just have not seen a ton of the photos, but I look at the ones I have seen and cringe thinking that the horse is going to have long term damage from having to walk like that.

#14 Arlene Magid

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:48 AM

Gotcha. So this is bad for every discipline other than the I think it is the "park horses"? The ones that try to imitate the "big lick saddlebred horses"? Almost every picture I have seen with the funky shoeing and pads the pastern looks like this. Maybe I am wrong and just have not seen a ton of the photos, but I look at the ones I have seen and cringe thinking that the horse is going to have long term damage from having to walk like that.



It ain't good for park horses either. I have wondered how many will break down even sooner now that the clown shoes are in use.
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#15 LaurieB

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:57 AM

Laurie, I wish more people did do their own critiques...I don't think as many do as should.
I've ruminated about writing a book on this topic but it would be a lot of work and with the smaller number of people breeding these days I am not sure how well it would sell.

I think a good, accurate documentary type of book would sell if it had clear examples of highly inheritable faults. I mean, we all know no horse is perfect. Not even the best of the best sires and dams are or were perfect. But breeders do want to do their best with so many points to consider and for some, the only starting place is the horse in front of them or the horses another breeder has.
I know I would love to have thought ahead and photographed the greats I met in person with an idea like this for the future. Blew it there!
Laurie


 

 


#16 LaurieB

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 08:16 AM

What came first, the coon foot or the straight or long pasterns? Also, post legged horses can eventually become coon footed. They break down behind with over work. My point is that conformational faults usually exsist that help cause coon footed.

Agree with this. Coon foot can develop over time with a condition that wears down the suspensory ligament and tendon that runs down the back of the leg. I forget the actual name of that condition. I see old horse at my friends sanctuary with it though. And then there are the breeds,like Paso's that are predisposed to the tendon issue that results in the coon foot appearance..mainly in the back legs with that situation. Have seen a few with the fetlocks nearly on the ground. Dont know if that is considered coon foot or caused by the tendon condition.
I havent personally worked with any horses with that fault but mechanics sure show the stress it would cause on the structures within the hoof as well as with the tendons.
I too have heard that depending on the actual reason for it, some horses can be sound for light riding for many years. Cant imagine a horse would hold up to strong work routines though.
Laurie


 

 


#17 D Taylor

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 08:52 AM

What came first, the coon foot or the straight or long pasterns? Also, post legged horses can eventually become coon footed. They break down behind with over work. My point is that conformational faults usually exsist that help cause coon footed.

Tam cam is right.But as ALL breeds were "stretched" out to accommodate the market for taller, longer horses excessive pastern length progressed beyond structural biomechanics....add a little age and "hard living" and coon foot can develope over time.

But I hear all the time from my non- Morgan friends how post legged they are and yes compared to their breeds they are as Morgans are selected for a perpindicular form. The difference is the pastern is short and thick in the Morgan as a breed. They do not break down into coon footed with age/use in general as the lever mechanics forces do not cause excessive degradation to the joint and other support/mechanics structures such as tendons and ligaments.

#18 tanzyrarabians

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:26 AM

Edited to add :

I think what really caught my eye was that really horridly dished front foot !


That horridly dished front foot is what my farrier calls a coon foot. Like a screwy version of a club foot...sort of....so what is the going term for a foot like that? I've seen several of those over the years, none caused by injury, (but acknowledge that something like that could be caused by injury) the horses were born with that weird foot in every case. And passed it on, 50% of the time.

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#19 horsendane

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:28 AM

Ok how about picking these legs apart? I think I know what I see, I just want to know what you guys see. I know it is hard to tell in pictures but please do your best. I'm learning and HIGHLY interested. This is the mare of mine that will not be bred due to I don't like her legs, other reasons too but I want to know what you see. We were riding in wet sand so pardon her hooves.

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#20 SDLArabians

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:35 AM

I'll take a shot, but I am a TOTAL amature when it comes to conformation critiques.

It looks like she toes out in the front and back and has a narrow base in the front. I would have to see a side conformation shot to see if she is behind at the knee or it could be the pic.

Again, just a guess!

Edited: From this angle you don't see the narrow chest at all. She is not behind at the knee. From this angle, her front legs line up; meaning fetlock is directly below the knee, knee is directly below the shoulder. Her hocks appear to be set nicely too.

My question would be: did the narrow chest cause the toeing out in front?

Edited by SDLArabians, 05 October 2011 - 09:53 AM.

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