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Drops shoulder while long lining


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#1 Jrchloe

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 08:07 PM

What do you do when you are long lining a horse and it drops it's inside shoulder in the circle and counter bends really bad? What is really going on body wise when a horse pretends to be a motorcycle on a circle? Or why is the horse dropping their shoulder while lining (sound horse)?

#2 Greentree

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 07:16 AM

I don't know how to explain how to do this, but the horse needs to move to the outside of the circle from the inside line. What else do you have on for equipment? I run the lines thru the stirrups on the saddle for a bit of a pulley effect, but I am not "setting heads" so I don't use any other stuff. It really helps them stay bent to the inside. Long lining is not easy, but I no longer lunge horses, because the long lining results are so much better. Get out of the round pen ASAP, so your horse does not "watch the fence".

Keep working that inside line for the bend(think of the nose at the point of the shoulder) then take a step toward the horse while keeping contact. but don't pull on the outside.

Hope this helps, sorry it is pretty hard to explain.

Nancy

ETA: If you are using a surcingle , DO not run the lines thru the top rings. Use a lower set,like I do the stirrups, and let the outside line come behind the horse, above his hocks. This lets you control the entire horse, not just the front.

#3 Mel Adjusted

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 09:24 AM

Are you using a straight line or a draw line?

#4 Jrchloe

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:52 PM

Would making squares instead of circling be beneficial for this problem?

#5 lkirby

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:49 PM

What your horse is doing is to try and cut across the circle to shorten the distance that he/she has to travel. You would use the outside long line, when long lining, to keep pressure on him/her to travel in a full circle and not take any short cuts.

Lorna G. Kirby, PE
When you have gone through fire, you won't fade in the sun!!

#6 saguaroarab4

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 07:13 AM

I do two things: I use multiple transitions in a circle to help the horse get their legs under them.

Additionally, I bring the horse into a smaller circle and expect their cadence to slow, swing their backs once they have relaxed (and sometimes before, at first) I allow them out on to the larger circle again. It's a little like spiraling in and out on a circle while riding. You can also do this at the canter as well. It aligns their body. If there is a particular spot where they always want to bulge I will transition before they reach it.

It won't last long.

#7 loriwoo

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 07:44 AM

All good answers, and each horse is different so just one more thing, so you can try things that work for YOUR horse,

How is the longing? Do they cut across and "go like a motercycle" on the longe line? If so, that is a balance/attention/ and/or respect issue.

If they are doing the motorcycle thing on the long lines, you need to go back to longing. THey should know EASY means either transition down, or slow within the gait, depending upon how advanced they are at that point.

Mostly physically what is happening, (you asked) is dropping the inside shoulder. Get that shoulder up and they can't do those things. So when longing if they are not balanced they'll drop that inside shoulder, or if they are smart, they do think they can shorten the distance by cutting across.
If it is possible, you can use your body language when longing to step toward their shoulder and get it up. Some horses don't respond to that, some do.

If they dont' respond to you stepping toward their shoulder, then when longiing, I take a piece of cotton clothes line and go from bit ring to upper surcingle ring, or that front saddle D and put that on the inside. On the outside you can put another line from the bit to the cinch region ring to prevent cutting in..
These are not tight, but they prevent excessive dropping or cutting in. The horse NOT HELD BY THE LINES, but is corrected as a rider would correct. But since your horse isn't ready to ride, this will help.

Sometimes long lining horses doesn't work on all horses. Arabians in particular are sensitive and the weight of the reins will make them do strange things they did not do while longing.
Do as was said and run the lines through the stirrup, but I find that those horses that get heavy or ignore things with too much long lining you can't just keep doing it or they don't progress, so I go ahead and ride them for a few minutes.

Ride them on the longe line so they can carry your weight and not get all wobbly, then do some walking and a bit of trotting when they are balanced. Your hands and legs will help more than extra long lining.
It is not the quality of silver on your horse, it is the quality of horse under your silver.

#8 loriwoo

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 07:49 AM

Here is how loose the reins are at first so they dont' hit them unexpectedly, , then you can tighten them up as he goes. Doesnt' do it all for you, but it helps

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It is not the quality of silver on your horse, it is the quality of horse under your silver.

#9 LaurieB

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:42 AM

I love long lining. Do you have your horse used to the outside line draping behind his hindquarter...above the hocks and below his butt? If you can safely get him/her used to that, the dropping the shoulder stops nearly every time. At least is has always worked for me and it gets them on the outside rein quite naturally.

Laurie


 

 


#10 LaurieB

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 01:34 PM

I like to follow up on some of the threads on here...how is your horse coming along?
Laurie