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What shows me a horse would be a good English show horse?


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#1 Ignorance

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 10:20 AM

My horse Tink is 'down-for-the-count' so I would like to start looking for a new horse thats young and spirited. Tink was bought for me in surprise so I never really horse shopped before. So any advice would be SUPER helpful, and not just English prospect! Also any advice on where to find a new horse would be awsome too :)

#2 ridetowin

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 11:50 AM

dreamhorse.com

equinenow.com

equine.com

http://www.arabianho...marketplace.asp

Look on ABN under sales :) good luck with your search !
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#3 siiamese

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 01:19 PM

so what you want is an already trained and proven show horse?
do you want a CEP horse or an EP or Park horse?
besides the ABN or AHA sales forums, I would contact the trainers who show saddleseat horses

#4 Ignorance

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 09:12 PM

No I asked what features of a horse should I be looking for when looking for an English/Hunter Pleasure horse that I can train?

#5 fyreflii7

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:25 PM

Long well-shaped neck with a thin throatlatch that ties into the shoulder/wither either extremely upright (English) or just moderately upright (Hunter). Think about the mold you want to put the horse in, and then think about what pieces needs to be able to move in which ways. An underslung neck with a thick throatlatch can't do what you want it to in either discipline.

Straight legs with good feet is important on any horse if you want to ride it for more than a few show seasons.

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#6 dragon

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:53 PM

Look at horses that are already started and have the talent and the want to for English or Hunter. Lot's of horses trot big free but can't do squat under saddle.

#7 Ignorance

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 09:31 AM

no..I want to train my own horse when I buy it so that when it wins I know I made it win not someone else

#8 arabsRgreat

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:02 PM

I think this is a very hard question and only the VERY skilled can look at a youngin' and state what its career will be. In fact I hear the trainers say they never know what a horse is going to do u/s till it is. A good example is a gelding we own. He is just a regular old horse (looks like a 4H horse: nothing special) standing around. But boy, slap some leather on him and he is a SHOW BOAT!! He bridles up high and is very snappy and fancy. He is a hunter but I would've passed on him if he wasn't already trained u/s.

My suggestion would be if you want to be "safe" is buy something that has just been started. In other words someone else has gotten the bucks out but you can finish it. I think most of the "glory" is going to be given to the one who finishes it rather than a "colt starter" But that way you will be able to see what its going to be and take that raw talent and make it into something yourself!

#9 secondchanceranch

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 07:05 PM

Often times you can tell what a young horse might be suited for by it's conformation and watching the way it naturally carries itself, but you never really know until you get them going.

If you're looking for a young prospect my advice is to STUDY! Research the English horses conformation and pedigrees, LEARN as much as you can about it! Pick a discipline and then pick a horse. A CEP, EP, Park & Hunt horse will all be different animals in conformation, movement and how they carry themselves. If you want a hunt horse you'll be looking for something quite different than if you're wanting a Park horse!

Hunt horses are relatively easy to find, but if you're looking for a quality, young prospect suited to CEP, EP, Park, etc. I would suggest contacting the trainers and/or looking for offspring of specific sires known to produce what you're wanting.

Basically, LEARN as much as you can and then buy :)

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#10 Ignorance

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 05:08 PM

I think this is a very hard question and only the VERY skilled can look at a youngin' and state what its career will be. In fact I hear the trainers say they never know what a horse is going to do u/s till it is. A good example is a gelding we own. He is just a regular old horse (looks like a 4H horse: nothing special) standing around. But boy, slap some leather on him and he is a SHOW BOAT!! He bridles up high and is very snappy and fancy. He is a hunter but I would've passed on him if he wasn't already trained u/s.

My suggestion would be if you want to be "safe" is buy something that has just been started. In other words someone else has gotten the bucks out but you can finish it. I think most of the "glory" is going to be given to the one who finishes it rather than a "colt starter" But that way you will be able to see what its going to be and take that raw talent and make it into something yourself!


I already know how to be safe thanks, and I've taken lots of bucks and broken bones on my first horse and I trained her from start to finish from when I first saw her as a 2 year old. Hehe, disaster as a start as it seemed but like you said I need to do some research, cuz I didn't exactly know what I was doing when I was 10 with a 2 year old filly, I truly finished her off about 10 months ago and thats when we started really moving forward towards nationals, until we found out about all of her conformation problems and such. I was really proud when we got our first 1st place ribbon, cuz I knew that was my horse winning and I trained it. So thats why I want to start with a young horse, ya I'm not going to start out as young as I started with Tink, but it sure made me a better rider and I'm glad I learned alot from Tink. Felt like I was the student instead of the crazy mare :P