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Mares foaling help


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#21 Monicario

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 11:07 PM

One of my mares is very over weight.
How will this effect the pregnancy and should I get her to lose it through exercise? Can I even do this during pregnancy?
What is more risker letting her stay over weight through the pregnancy or trying to get it off before it is a real problem?
She is a very easy keeper and maintains this weight in my mind on little food.

Then again my neighbors say's I feed to much.

My vet say's my feed is just right that this mare just needs lots of exercise..

I wanted ask you guys and see what you know

Even her previous owners had the same problem when she was not doing her events and not in endurance and just in a stall or corral or pasture she gains weight.
It seems like she needs to be worked regularly to maintain a healthy weight.

#22 cvm2002

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 05:42 AM

Pregnancy is not the time to be losing weight in my opinion. Feed her healthy and the rest will sort itself out. In the first 2/3 of the pregnancy, there is no need to feed her any different than what she's currently being fed. As you get into the latter parts, you may need to increase the feed as the fetus is growing. If the mare is in good body condition to begin with, I typically recommend feeding to maintain that condition. You don't want them porking up, likewise you don't want them losing weight. Regardless, I personally think its prudent to have all pregnant mares on some sort of vitamin & mineral supplement throughout the gestation.

As far as exercise goes, it depends on the mare and her level of activity. If she's used to being ridden, there is no reason to NOT continue that, at least through months 7-8. You don't want to be introducing new things and obviously don't want to be doing major intensity activity. How long into the gestation you ride depends on the mare. Some can be ridden right up until they foal, others would just as soon kill you if you brought a saddle out much past 8 months. In short, a fit mare will have an easier pregnancy & delivery than an unfit mare. Exercise is healthy!

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#23 tvfarm

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 09:05 AM

The best thing you can do for yourself and your mares is to RELAX and study.
No matter how hard you prepare, if you breed much you will loose some.
Get your head/heart ready for the possibility. This can be the most wonderful or most tragic day.
Education is your best defence against something going bad but even then you will loose some.
We have raised four orphans and have lost many foals and mares over the twenty years we have been breeding.
I like to think we have lost less than most breeders. We do our best to be prepared.
No matter the loss, the great joy still outweighs the bad, most years.

Have your med kit ready, have the vet on standby, keep close touch with anyone nearby that can assist.

Most of all relax! They have been doing this for thousands of years.
Most of the time you just have to stand back and watch
Good luck and send us lots of photos! LOL

#24 Monicario

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 02:39 PM

Well they get there Horse Guard vitamins everyday for sure.

Thank you all your responses

What about color of the foals?
In your experiences do you have a good idea of what the color of the foal will most likely be if you can see the pedigree on both parents.

I know it is a guess but when you do are you usually right?

#25 cvm2002

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:18 PM

Arabian color genetics are pretty easy....If you post the colors of the dam & sire, we can at least give the possibilities. Bay is dominant, chestnut to chestnut always yields chestnut, one parent must be grey to get a grey offspring.

Veterinarian by day, and some nights, and most Saturdays, and every 6th weekend and holidays. Wannabe photographer the rest of the time!


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#26 Monicario

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 07:41 PM

The Stallion is a Black with a little white in the feet. My Mare is Bay with a star and white on the feet. So with these two black vs bay.

My other mare is a solid chestnut breed to a black stallion the same as above. My chestnut has grey in her lips and nose and by eyes. Black Vs Chestnut

My other mare would also be a Bay breed to the same black stallion. Black vs Bay

What color do you think the foals will be for these three mares?

I can't wait to find out

#27 CSclare

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 07:59 PM

One thing not mentioned was fescue. I didn't see a location in your profile so if you are in a region with this type of grass/hay switch to something else. It can cause many problems for mare and foal.
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#28 cvm2002

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 09:52 PM

The Stallion is a Black with a little white in the feet. My Mare is Bay with a star and white on the feet. So with these two black vs bay.

My other mare is a solid chestnut breed to a black stallion the same as above. My chestnut has grey in her lips and nose and by eyes. Black Vs Chestnut

My other mare would also be a Bay breed to the same black stallion. Black vs Bay

What color do you think the foals will be for these three mares?

I can't wait to find out


Obviously, you can't guarantee what color you're going to get without knowing the genetics that each horse carries. Do you know if the stallion is a homozygous black? Has he ever sired a chestnut foal?

The stallion's genetics are E_aa (both recessive agouti genes, at least one dominant Extension, other Extension gene could be either dominant or recessive). If we were to know he's homozygous black, he'd be EEaa
The two bay mares are even harder to guess. They could be EEAA, EeAA, EEAa or EeAa (Must have one dominant Extension for black base, at least one Dominant Agouti to be bay)
The chestnut mare is ee for Extension, but we don't know anything about Agouti. Could be AA, Aa or aa

For any of the matings, you *could* get black, bay or chestnut, ultimately depending on what the "hidden" genes are. Unfortunately no guarantees with these, unless you've had them color tested. For example, my own mare is chestnut (ee) so I didn't know her Agouti status and had her tested. Came back as AA, so she cannot produce black.

Veterinarian by day, and some nights, and most Saturdays, and every 6th weekend and holidays. Wannabe photographer the rest of the time!


www.wildsidearabians.com

Home of Canadian Top Ten stallion Antham (*Rushan AHSB x WN Sharazada)

 


#29 Monicario

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 01:24 PM

One thing not mentioned was fescue. I didn't see a location in your profile so if you are in a region with this type of grass/hay switch to something else. It can cause many problems for mare and foal.



My mares are only feed Orchard Grass.
I have herd about that hay and pregnancy.

Thank You for the advise

Obviously, you can't guarantee what color you're going to get without knowing the genetics that each horse carries. Do you know if the stallion is a homozygous black? Has he ever sired a chestnut foal?

The stallion's genetics are E_aa (both recessive agouti genes, at least one dominant Extension, other Extension gene could be either dominant or recessive). If we were to know he's homozygous black, he'd be EEaa
The two bay mares are even harder to guess. They could be EEAA, EeAA, EEAa or EeAa (Must have one dominant Extension for black base, at least one Dominant Agouti to be bay)
The chestnut mare is ee for Extension, but we don't know anything about Agouti. Could be AA, Aa or aa

For any of the matings, you *could* get black, bay or chestnut, ultimately depending on what the "hidden" genes are. Unfortunately no guarantees with these, unless you've had them color tested. For example, my own mare is chestnut (ee) so I didn't know her Agouti status and had her tested. Came back as AA, so she cannot produce black.


Well thank you.

Is it possible to kinda tell if I give you the pedigree info and you can see what all there parents and grandparents colors are?

#30 cvm2002

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 03:52 PM

Perhaps.....but ultimately it still depends on what genetics each individual carries. What would help more than THEIR parents/grandparents' colors would be the colors of any offspring.

Veterinarian by day, and some nights, and most Saturdays, and every 6th weekend and holidays. Wannabe photographer the rest of the time!


www.wildsidearabians.com

Home of Canadian Top Ten stallion Antham (*Rushan AHSB x WN Sharazada)