Jump to content


Photo

Mares foaling help


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
122 replies to this topic

#11 Christie

Christie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 580 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:14 PM

The Nature of Foaling is the best foaling video. Highly recommend everyone watch it. www.foaling.com
Just My Opinion

Posted Image

#12 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:36 PM

What I see wrong is that your babies still have 4 more months to bake and if born now, would not survive. Usually, they will not survive before day 320. They are about the size of a small lamb at this point. Again, does your vet know the due dates of these foals?? Fluid and fuller utters ARE normal, at a certain point in pregnancy. NOT if they are due in Sept.

As to the mare who doesn't want you messing with your udders, I suggest you stop trying before you get your head kicked off. I'm sorry if I sound harsh, but there is just something wrong here...


I would only be doing what I was told by my vet.

she said to continue messing with them to desensitize the one mare, for the foal or she will not allow the foal to eat. Then what will I do with a orphan foal?
FYI: By the way I have not even messed with her utters even though she said to, because I was scared of being knee but I am worried that I am going to hurt the foal by not getting her mother ready for it.

I don't get it you are saying there is something wrong.
When my vet already said that it is normal for the one mare to have liquid come(if you squeeze them) out when the mare has foaled before but not to mess with there utters.
The only reason I ever messed with them was to check and see if there was a change in there utters to see if they were pregnant to begin with.

Yes my vet knows there due date.

My mares are fine and this stuff has been going on since a few months after they were breed.
I'm just asking about why the 2 mares are so different from the third mare.
I didn't think there was anything wrong and neither did my vet or friends.

I just need advise on other experiences with there horses and if each mares utters were so different from one another.
My Vet say's they look healthy.

Maybe you are misunderstanding me when I say utter have fluid.
I mean they are not full to capacity they are just getting fuller each month and warmer and the one mare that dose not have warm or full nipple's but warm and filling milk bags, I just needed to know why is she different and if it could be possible she is not pregnant.

I didn't think anyone would take it the way you did.

I'm sorry I'm really not trying to take you the wrong way thats all.
I hope it is just that you misunderstood me.

I just was seeing all the changes my mares are going through and the most significant was the utters and the being tired on that one day.

Hopefully I was able to clarify some things and it is not to confusing what I was asking.

Thank you all for your continued help and info, all is appreciated for sure.

The Nature of Foaling is the best foaling video. Highly recommend everyone watch it. www.foaling.com


Thank You for your help.

#13 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:58 PM

Vaccination-wise, the standard recommendation is for rhinopneumonitis (either Pneumabort-K or Prodigy) at 3, 5, 7 & 9 months gestation, with routine pre-foaling boosters at 10 months gestation. As long as the mares are maintaining body condition, I wouldn't worry too much about their food quirks. Pickles & ice cream anyone??! One other concern with the mare taking long to eat her feed is that there is some kind of dental issue going on that may need to be addressed.

Happy to help with any advice you need along the way. Probably the best thing I can recommend is to get a good foaling manual and learn about the normal foaling process NOW. "Blessed are the Broodmares" is historically the reference of choice, although some of the information in it is a bit out of date; great reference, but hasn't been updated in quite some time. Another is "The Complete Book of Foaling" by Karen Hayes.


OK great.
Thank you for your help with this question.
It sounds like you are on the same page as my other vet other than the 3rd month shot.
I hope I didn't hurt anything when I didn't give them one at 3months gestation.

P.S
Thank You for the book ideas.
I'll to be sure and buy those A.S.A.P

#14 cvm2002

cvm2002

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,220 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:04 PM

No, many people don't do the 3-month vaccine, so you're fine.

The concern about the udder development is that premature mammary development in a pregnant mare is a hallmark sign of placentitis. These mares will typically bag up just as they will before they foal. Having *some* mammary development during pregnancy is normal, as any woman who has carried a child will attest. Clear fluid is not uncommon either, whether they've foaled or not. I've always been able to get a little bit of fluid off of my gal even before she was bred; a lot of it has to do with diet and presence of plant estrogens in the legumes (soy, alfalfa, clover).

If I'm reading and understanding correctly, you're simply seeing gradual enlargement on the bags, which is normal. Sudden enlargement over the course of a few days at this point would not be normal, but little by little shouldn't be anything to be too concerned about.

Veterinarian by day, and some nights, and most Saturdays, and every 6th weekend and holidays. Wannabe photographer the rest of the time!


www.wildsidearabians.com

Home of Canadian Top Ten stallion Antham (*Rushan AHSB x WN Sharazada)

 


#15 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:10 PM

No, many people don't do the 3-month vaccine, so you're fine.

The concern about the udder development is that premature mammary development in a pregnant mare is a hallmark sign of placentitis. These mares will typically bag up just as they will before they foal. Having *some* mammary development during pregnancy is normal, as any woman who has carried a child will attest. Clear fluid is not uncommon either, whether they've foaled or not. I've always been able to get a little bit of fluid off of my gal even before she was bred; a lot of it has to do with diet and presence of plant estrogens in the legumes (soy, alfalfa, clover).

If I'm reading and understanding correctly, you're simply seeing gradual enlargement on the bags, which is normal. Sudden enlargement over the course of a few days at this point would not be normal, but little by little shouldn't be anything to be too concerned about.



Yes you are right gradual enlargement is what I've noticed
Thank You, you hit it right on the nail.
You understand what I'm trying to say.

#16 Hoofhaven

Hoofhaven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,719 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:15 PM

I would definitely suggest picking up one of the books mentioned. I have "The Complete Book Of Foaling" that I purchased as a crash course when I discovered A mare I was given was in foal! I was panicked and afraid as I had n0t prepared for this event, and had less than a month (we guessed) for her to foal. It is a great guide line for what you can expect.

As far as their udders go, they are ALL different, but being bagged up (having a full udder) that soon before they are due would be concerning to me as well. Are you certain of their breeding dates?

They are all SO different.... My mare that foaled last year had never foaled before, and had a very small udder right until AFTER she foaled! I was no expecting her to have the baby so soon, and she went into labor in the pasture and I had to rush her into the barn!

There are many signs to watch for and lots of things during a normal foaling that you need to be aware of, and also must know when to call the vet. Its very difficult to cover everything you'd need to know on this forum, because there is SO much! Both of the books mentioned are VERY thick, but good reading from conception right until the foal is weaned!

The mare will get upset about having her udder handled as it fills because it will become sensitive. It is a good idea if you can SAFELY accustom her to gentle handling so you can keep checking her, and so if need be when the foal is born you can assist it in finding its first meal. Just because she doesn't wand YOU touching it, doesn't mean she won't let her foal drink.

The mare that I purchased unknowingly in foal hated me even LOOKING at her udder! Even if I stood ten feet away and bent down to look she would pin her ears at me. If I tied her and told her to stand and was careful I could feel, but I didn't bother her much about it, and she had no issues letting her foal drink. After the baby was born, she also let me handle her udder.

There is many people here who are VERY experienced at breeding and foaling, and will be very helpful. I am well read, but I am only expecting my third and fourth this year!

Hoof-Haven Equestrian Ltd.

www.hoof-haven.com

Posted Image


#17 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:36 PM

I would definitely suggest picking up one of the books mentioned. I have "The Complete Book Of Foaling" that I purchased as a crash course when I discovered A mare I was given was in foal! I was panicked and afraid as I had n0t prepared for this event, and had less than a month (we guessed) for her to foal. It is a great guide line for what you can expect.

As far as their udders go, they are ALL different, but being bagged up (having a full udder) that soon before they are due would be concerning to me as well. Are you certain of their breeding dates?

They are all SO different.... My mare that foaled last year had never foaled before, and had a very small udder right until AFTER she foaled! I was no expecting her to have the baby so soon, and she went into labor in the pasture and I had to rush her into the barn!

There are many signs to watch for and lots of things during a normal foaling that you need to be aware of, and also must know when to call the vet. Its very difficult to cover everything you'd need to know on this forum, because there is SO much! Both of the books mentioned are VERY thick, but good reading from conception right until the foal is weaned!

The mare will get upset about having her udder handled as it fills because it will become sensitive. It is a good idea if you can SAFELY accustom her to gentle handling so you can keep checking her, and so if need be when the foal is born you can assist it in finding its first meal. Just because she doesn't wand YOU touching it, doesn't mean she won't let her foal drink.

The mare that I purchased unknowingly in foal hated me even LOOKING at her udder! Even if I stood ten feet away and bent down to look she would pin her ears at me. If I tied her and told her to stand and was careful I could feel, but I didn't bother her much about it, and she had no issues letting her foal drink. After the baby was born, she also let me handle her udder.

There is many people here who are VERY experienced at breeding and foaling, and will be very helpful. I am well read, but I am only expecting my third and fourth this year!



Your experiences helps me allot.
I hope I can ask you any other question if there are any.

Wow I am scared how am I going to deal with three mares giving birth only days apart from each other.
Sounds like dealing with one mare is going to be hard enough but three. uuuhhhH

Thank You all very much.

#18 Hoofhaven

Hoofhaven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,719 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:39 PM

Your experiences helps me allot.
I hope I can ask you any other question if there are any.

Wow I am scared how am I going to deal with three mares giving birth only days apart from each other.
Sounds like dealing with one mare is going to be hard enough but three. uuuhhhH

Thank You all very much.



Just because they are all DUE at the same time doesn't mean they will foal at the same time. My mare (first timer) was due OVER two WEEKS ago!!! I am going crazy waiting!

If you have any questions, I am sure someone will be willing to help you , but I can sure try and offer up some advice! :)

Hoof-Haven Equestrian Ltd.

www.hoof-haven.com

Posted Image


#19 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 07:37 PM

Just because they are all DUE at the same time doesn't mean they will foal at the same time. My mare (first timer) was due OVER two WEEKS ago!!! I am going crazy waiting!

If you have any questions, I am sure someone will be willing to help you , but I can sure try and offer up some advice! :)



I know it won't be the same day but it sure will feel back to back for me.
My mares were breed the first mare for three straight days then the second mare the next day after the first mare was done with her's for three days every other day with that one and then the other mare for three days every other day.

I hope that makes since it's even a little confusing to me when I write it that way.

Thank You for your help

#20 Monicario

Monicario

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Posted 04 May 2010 - 10:58 PM

What do you recommend for exercise on a pregnant mare?
My normal summer rides are riding through the Forrest through pretty large mountains most rides are anywhere from 2 to 5 hour rides.
I live in the Forrest so right now it is my only place to ride.

I was already told not to jump my mares but was not given a plan for what I can do when they are pregnant.