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#1 AudraKolodziejski

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 12:04 PM

Hello everyone!!

I have a question that has plagued me for years and I really need some advice!! I have a beautiful and ethereal straight egyptian stallion by the great THE DESPERADO and out of the legendary MISS MAGGIE MAE. this stallion was bred by Cadron Creek Arabians and I bought him as youn horse with the intention of using for breeding but I bought him sight unseen and when I got him he had a clubfoot!! i kept him but have not used him for breeding...I dont want to perpetuate the problem. he is still a stallion and getting more beautiful every year so I am wondering if club feet are genetic and if I should take that risk or just geld him and turn him out to pasture with my mares. What does everyone thing?? I would love to know!

#2 ladycascabel

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 12:09 PM

Club feet do run in certain lines. How bad is it? I'd hesitate to give "definitely do not breed" advice without seeing the hoof in question.

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#3 Metallic36

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 12:10 PM

The club foot issue is genetic, sometimes it can be caused by an injury but it has been known to be genetic with the TD horses. I wouldn't breed him myself, I have a TD son as well so I can relate some and I can say I would geld my guy if he had that problem.. I wouldn't breed a horse that does have a club foot, and I really doubt others would want to breed to it as well. I say geld and enjoy him, I'm just not a fan of breeding any horse with a club foot, even if it was a mare and not a stallion.

Wanted to add.. that's really unfortunate the seller wasn't honest about the club foot.. even buying sight unseen, every photo you can get your hands on is useful. Unfortunately that's usually my first request and my first question.. photos of the hooves, and asking if they have any club feet. Unfortunately you'll have some sellers do the "don't get asked, don't have to tell" thing.




#4 Sally

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 12:44 PM

I bought a young Padron grandson that had a club foot. I made the decision to
geld him because of it. I did not want the possibility of passing it on. There are way
too many arabians that have "the" club foot/high-low, the problem is no one really
knows what a true club foot is, it is very controversal. I wish more breeders would
do more research and start breeding it out.... just my thoughts because dealing with
a club foot has not been fun!

#5 El Bey Angel

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 12:47 PM

And sometimes you have sellers who even when asked aren't honest. We've driven a whole day to see a horse after having been given a few photos and been told they were in great health with perfect feet (I always ask thoroughly), only to find out it wasn't the case and they had major feet/health problems that had occured after the photos were taken OR internal heath issues. Naturally the owners try and downplay such things when we got there, but the story was far different from what I heard over the phone.
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#6 srshani

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 01:20 PM

my mare has a very slight club foot whether it was do to injury or genetic i don't know, however her 2009 filly hasn't yet showed any signs of inheriting this defect. I would say it depends on how bad it is on your stallion, if its very apparent I'd say geld and enjoy him, but if its not horrible my farrier said that there are some things you can do for horses with clubbed feet if its very slight. You can also test breed him if you that hesitant about gelding him to see what he throws.

#7 Shahwanamar

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 04:15 PM

Hello everyone!!

I have a question that has plagued me for years and I really need some advice!! I have a beautiful and ethereal straight egyptian stallion by the great THE DESPERADO and out of the legendary MISS MAGGIE MAE. this stallion was bred by Cadron Creek Arabians and I bought him as youn horse with the intention of using for breeding but I bought him sight unseen and when I got him he had a clubfoot!! i kept him but have not used him for breeding...I dont want to perpetuate the problem. he is still a stallion and getting more beautiful every year so I am wondering if club feet are genetic and if I should take that risk or just geld him and turn him out to pasture with my mares. What does everyone thing?? I would love to know


Hi Audra,
I personally don't think that a club foot is genetic!!! But before everyone has a reaction to this, I will explain myself. I owned a colt that was out of a small mare 14.2 that was by a stallion who was 15.3. When this colt was a foal and up until he was a yearling, his feet were perfect.
I leave my horses out in the pastures to eat as they please. ************Has anyone ever seen a horse spread their feet when eating. One foot in front of the other spread to allow them to reach the ground to graze. *********Notice that they have one foot forward and the other foot is back. In a growing horse the feet are very susceptible to change. We always put a small amout of correction to young horses to establish change to help the way of going on growing horses. Imagine giving a horse all of his time in the pasture to affect this kind of gross correction. The coffin bone rotates and there is a result of the front foot that has a low heel, while the back foot has a high heel that has a distinctive bulge at the coronet band then a dip below the bulge. If this is let to happen without interuption, the horse that was perfect as a young yearling will eventually develop a club foot.
One can describe the results this way: The foot that was kept back all the time will exhibit a high heel with less width between the bars of the hoof. There will be a bulge below the coronet band and a dip below the bulge. The heel will usually have a straight profile from the bulb of the heel to the surface. The foot that was kept in front will exhibit a contracted heel and a wide profile between the bars resulting in a platter look.
I have headed off a club foot by feeding susceptible horses above the ground in a feeder and limiting the access to pasture grazing. An aggressive program of trimming that keeps the heel trimmed off of the back held foot and not touching the toe unless it is needed. The hoof of the front held foot would only have the toe trimmed off and not touching the heel.

I wanted to conclude that it is my opinion that these horses are not inheriting the club foot, but the tendancy to become club footed is because of the large long legged horses we breed these days. The resulting club foot is then environmental because of the inherited long legs that require the horse to spread their feet when grazing. If this horse is raised in a stall and fed only up in the air while in their rapid growing stage of their life and not allowed to spread their feet while grazing, will then be normal when compared to a similarly bred horse that is allowed to spread their legs during the same period of time in their growing phase.
I have personally spent a large stud fee on the above colt that I eventually gelded. I did not experience the two young horses that I have saved from this tendancy because of my vigilance before I spent 10,000 on the stud fee.
I would love any opinions on this. One would be that we should not breed long legged growthy horses. Or be vigilant to the pitfalls of these horses.
Respectfully submitted. Thank You.

Mark M. Hanna

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#8 siiamese

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 05:14 PM

a major flaw that I would not want to breed on into the offspring

#9 Lotus

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 05:30 PM

Do you have photos of your stallion that you could post? Including his legs? I don't think I could answer your question without seeing the overall quality of the horse and what his legs looked like.

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#10 windridge

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 05:32 PM

While I am inclined to agree with the others to geld him and enjoy him. I still think it is probably worth talking to the vet and blacksmith first to get their opinions and maybe have a professional evaluate him as a breeding prospect. All horses have good and bad points you just need to make sure that the positive attribute more than make up for his club foot and any other negative points he may have.
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