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The Canter....and Bell Boots!


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#11 dragon

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 04:16 PM

Is your farrier a Certified Farrier?? Trailers won't slow down squat. There are inside/outside trailers for horses that travel too narrow/too wide behind.

Do a search for certified farriers at American Farriers Association for the ones in your state.

#12 VanAlma

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 04:18 PM

You should also try a rolled toe in the front if you haven't already. The excessive long toe for CEP causes late breakover - not to mention excess strain on the ligaments - so a rolled toe will help him break over sooner, will reduce some of the strain and will help prevent the interference.

#13 elitearab

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 06:17 PM

We have a gelding that also forges, he has a very long easy stride and the few things that have helped are: squaring the toes in back, plus we keep him barefoot behind, when he was shod all the way around he would get sore if he hit. Toe weights have also helped, but the toe can not be long like a SS horse. We have had the best luck in raising his heel angle and keeping his toes shorter. It's funny, every farrier I've talked to about this has a different opinion on what will fix it. Or they will say collect him, yes collection works but they don't understand that he also has to be able to extend and lengthen. As far as riding, having him take shorter, quicker more active strides has helped. Ironically this horse has the best canter on any purebred I've seen. He has what the dressage instructor calls a 'joyous bounding canter' very uphill and bold. His trot is coming, but every once in awhile he will still clip during a lengthening or extension. It is a frustrating thing to deal with but it can be worked with :)

#14 LuvmyKamin

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 06:47 PM

Hello,

I have been working my now five year old for a year now, and I really think he has a great canter. He just has great action and cadence at the canter and it is so fun to ride with great equitation! At the trot i still sometimes battle him rushing the bridle so he slightly inconsistant. It seems that all of the focus is on the trot in the show ring... so i am interested in seeing how a horse will do that can "out canter" the other ones. Any thoughts or comments would be interesting and appreciated.

Bell boots. When my horse becomes lazy he will smack the back of his front feet with his hind from time to time. I have put on several types of bell boots and they all leave him raw around the ankle when he's done....what is the remedy for this? I thought of trying to cut the boots so they are shorter for less rubbing on the ground...but i hear the shoe hitting the shoe...anyway any advice appreciated!


I agree with the others.. square the hind toes and I would also talk to your farrier about putting half rounds on the fronts.. they'll help him break over better. I had a horse in training years ago who was a BAD forger.. squaring the hind and half rounds on the front cured the problem.

#15 siiamese

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 06:32 AM

my horse wears boots when she is working
I found these for her a couple of weeks ago ( http://www.valleyvet...b6-da5584b81bc0 ) and they are working very well
have used these for quite a while as well http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item588532df8e

be sure to get them big enough so they cover the entire back of the hoof

#16 Mel Adjusted

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 10:28 AM

You should also try a rolled toe in the front if you haven't already. The excessive long toe for CEP causes late breakover - not to mention excess strain on the ligaments - so a rolled toe will help him break over sooner, will reduce some of the strain and will help prevent the interference.


THis is what I would try first , as it is most likely that your problem is that your front end is too slow, rather than your hindend too fast. If he interferes when he gets 'lazy', it is probably because he is dropping down in front and losing elevation. Squaring the hind foot is a good idea any way. I'm not a big fan of trailers, I would try other things first.

#17 Jrchloe

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 02:58 PM

May I ask what you mean by rushing the bridle? Like diving, leaning on your hands?